Modern printing capabilities - a quantum leap in action!

CMYK stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Key (Key is just another name for Black). It's basically the opposite of RGB. Because the CMYK subtractive model is mainly used in color printing, and paper and other printing materials are light reflecting surfaces, it is more convenient to calculate how much light (and colors) are reflected from one surface or the other than how much is absorbed.

CMYK stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Key (Key is just another name for Black). It's basically the opposite of RGB. Because the CMYK subtractive model is mainly used in color printing, and paper and other printing materials are light reflecting surfaces, it is more convenient to calculate how much light (and colors) are reflected from one surface or the other than how much is absorbed. "Subtractive" means "subtracted" - we subtract the primary colors from white. So, if you subtract from white the three primary RGB colors, we get three additional CMY colors.

The CMYK model offers less color coverage than the additive RGB model. For example, if you combine yellow and purple (ie subtract yellow from purple), you will get red. You can combine any two Cyan, Magenta, or Yellow colors to create one of three RGB colors. If this looks a bit confusing, just try to think about drawing with colored pencils. If you combine two different colors, you get a third. So it's the same as CMYK. When you combine all three colors, the final color turns gray. Because we also need black, this is the fourth color. That's why CMYK is sometimes called a four-color system.

CMYK is recommended for any print material. Why do we use CMYK for printing? It has greater color accuracy, meaning even the smallest details and designs will look clearer. In CMYK, the color intensity is not as flexible as in RGB, because it is simply not possible to reproduce on paper or fabric the ink with the same intensity and brightness that your display can show. This means that some RGB colors simply do not appear when printing in CMYK.

By default, design software (Photoshop, etc.) uses RGB mode. If your projects are designed exclusively for the Internet, this is the best option. But print designs must be made in CMYK. Now to answer the previous question why you should design in CMYK and then convert to RGB for print from Wall31:

  • We need PNG files. Only RGB allows you to export to this file. CMYK does not work with PNG format;
  • Using CMYK sometimes (depending on the software) can cause problems if the file has multiple layers

Printing capabilities

It depends on the software and version you are using. There are currently many videos on Youtube with instructions for various software. If you do not find the opportunity to work with CMYK and RGB - contact us and we will help you in the file conversion. CMYK and RGB are used for different tasks and it is important to know when to use them. As we do our own printing, we stay within the CMYK range, but convert the designs to RGB to produce PNGs.

CMYK is recommended for any print material. Why do we use CMYK for printing? It has greater color accuracy, meaning even the smallest details and designs will look clearer. In CMYK, the color intensity is not as flexible as in RGB, because it is simply not possible to reproduce on paper or fabric the ink with the same intensity and brightness that your display can show. This means that some RGB colors simply do not appear when printing in CMYK.

By default, design software (Photoshop, etc.) uses RGB mode. If your projects are designed exclusively for the Internet, this is the best option. But print designs must be made in CMYK. Now to answer the previous question why you should design in CMYK and then convert to RGB for print from Wall31: